Breast Cancer Awareness Month

October marks Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

In this post we gather all relevant links to help our lesbian, bi, queer women, trans women and men, intersex and non-binary people to stay healthy and find inclusive information about breast cancer. 

We know that our communities have much lower screening rates. For those who have experienced forced displacement these rates maybe even higher. 

Talk Touch Test by ACON NSW

 #Talk about breast and chest health with our community: start a conversation with our partners and families, our workmates and teammates, our lovers and friends.

#Touch to get to know your body (or someone else’s!) and make breast checks and breast health a lifelong habit.

#Test by getting free mammograms through BreastScreen NSW if you’re over 40. If you’re between 50-74 you need to get a mammogram every two years.

Click here to read more.

Information for lesbian, queer and bisexual women

“Over 1 in 12 lesbian and bisexual women aged between 50 – 79 have been diagnosed with breast cancer, compared with 1 in 20 of women in general.” (Prescription for Change, Stonewall, 2008). Click here to read more.

Breast Screen Victoria: Information on Breast Cancer for trans and gender diverse people

Full information here. If you are between the ages of 50 and 74:

Trans womenIf you have been taking gender-affirming hormones (like oestrogen) for five years or more, screening every two years may be of benefit.If you have taken hormones for less than five years, or have not taken hormones, screening is not recommended.
Trans menIf you have not had chest surgery, screening every two years is recommended.There are no clear recommendations for people who have had chest surgery. We suggest talking to your doctor about your individual risk factors including previous surgical and hormone treatment. If your doctor confirms or you are sure that you have no remaining breast tissue, screening is not possible or necessary.
Non-binary/gender diverse people If you were assigned female at birth and have not had chest surgery, screening is recommended.There are no clear recommendations for people who have had chest surgery. We suggest talking to your doctor about your individual risk factors including previous surgical and hormone treatment. If your doctor confirms or you are sure that you have no remaining breast tissue, screening is not possible or necessary. 

If you were assigned male at birth and have been taking gender-affirming hormones (like oestrogen) for five years or more, screening every two years may be of benefit.

Article: What trans men and nonbinary people need to know about breast cancer

  • It seems to be rare, but trans men and AFAB (assigned female at birth) nonbinary people can still develop breast cancer even after top surgery, and/or while taking testosterone
  • We don’t know how gender-affirming testosterone therapy affects a person’s risk of developing breast cancer 
  • Binding does not increase the risk for breast cancer.

Read full article here.

BreastScreen NSW Information about breast cancer in 28 community languages.